French Lessons

Topics

A Rendezvous with Rendez-Vous

The word rendez-vous is the second-person plural imperative form of the verb se rendre ("to go" or "to present oneself"). It literally means "go!" or "present yourself!" But rather than a command, you'll hear it most often used as a noun—un rendez-vous. In English, "a rendezvous" is another word for "a meeting." Un rendez-vous means that and much more, as you'll see in this lesson.

 

If you're a regular Yabla French user, you'll recognize this word from the final caption of nearly every video in our Voyage en France series:

 

Je vous donne rendez-vous très bientôt pour de nouvelles découvertes. 
I will meet you very soon for some new discoveries.
Cap. 50, Voyage en France - Mont-Valérien

 

Donner rendez-vous à (literally, "to give meeting to") is to arrange to meet someone, to set up a date or an appointment with someone. Indeed, besides "a meeting," un rendez-vous can also be "a date" or "an appointment": 

 

C'est au premier rendez-vous qu'ils franchissent le pas
It's on the first date that they take that step
Cap. 5, Grand Corps Malade - Roméo kiffe Juliette

 

J'ai rendez-vous chez le dentiste et je suis en retard!
I have an appointment at the dentist and I'm late!
Cap. 10, Micro-Trottoirs - Art ou science?

 

Note the discrepancy between the French and the English in that last example: when talking about having an appointment with someone, you don't have to say j'ai un rendez-vousJ'ai rendez-vous will suffice.

 

In French, you don't "make" an appointment with someone—you "take" (prendre) one:

 

Aujourd'hui, on va apprendre à prendre rendez-vous chez le médecin.
Today we're going to learn how to make an appointment at the doctor's.
Cap. 1, Manon et Clémentine - Rendez-vous chez le médecin

 

And if something is by appointment only, it's sur rendez-vous ("on appointment"):

 

au trente-neuf rue Saint-Pavin des Champs sur rendez-vous
at thirty-nine Saint-Pavin des Champs Street by appointment
Cap. 38, Le Mans TV - Le Mans: Ouverture d'un nouvel atelier d'artistes

 

Un rendez-vous can refer both to a meeting and a meeting place:

 

Ce château était un rendez-vous de chasse.
This castle was a rendezvous point for hunting.
Cap. 26, Le Mans TV - Mon Village - Malicorne - Part 5

 

Here's an interesting example that uses rendez-vous in more of a metaphoric sense: 

 

Le soleil est au rendez-vous pour ce nouveau numéro de la découverte de la ville de Provins.
The sun is present for this new episode of the discovery of the city of Provins.
Cap. 2, Voyage en France - La ville de Provins - Part 3

 

The sun is "at the meeting" for this new episode—in other words, the sun is out. Être au rendez-vous means "to be present." The expression is used in the negative in Part 1 of Le Jour où tout a basculé - J'ai piégé mon fan to describe an actress's lack of success in recent years:

 

Sophie est une comédienne célèbre, mais depuis quelques années le succès n'est plus au rendez-vous.
Sophie is a famous actress, but success has been hard to come by for several years.
Cap. 1-2, Le Jour où tout a basculé - J'ai piégé mon fan - Part 1

 

Mais depuis deux ans, le succès n'est plus vraiment au rendez-vous.
But for the last two years, success has been somewhat elusive.
Cap. 41, Le Jour où tout a basculé - J'ai piégé mon fan - Part 1

 

That about does it for this lesson. Nous vous donnons rendez-vous très bientôt pour une nouvelle leçon (We'll meet you very soon for a new lesson)!

Vocabulary

You May Also Like